Christmas Day 2011

The spirit of Christmas

There were many Christmas parties, lunches, dinners and get- togethers in the lead up to Christmas Day. The shops were filled with shoppers – relatives, friends, and colleagues all looking for that  special gift. It is that time of the year when our minds turn to gift shopping, buying and giving. Most people will open their gifts on Christmas Day, 25th December, 2011 and celebrations continue well into Boxing Day, 26th December.

A big part of the shopping is for food that will make our celebration of Christmas unique. And talking about food shopping at this time, I treasure the freedom to be able to choose what makes a Christmas meal in my own home. There is no pressure to rush around for ham, turkey or whatever – can you imagine if millions of Papua New Guineans were searching for that ‘national’ Christmas meaty centrepiece for their Christmas meal. That will most certainly change our shopping habits for Christmas Day in Papua New Guinea. One could be eating fish on Christmas Day which we did – a succulent Red Emperor (from the pristine waters of Tufi), aibika from our very own back garden cooked in coconut cream, Highlands potatoes, tender lamb chops and Thai jasmine rice graced our Christmas table followed by home-made pawpaw pie (my late Mom’s recipe) – all cooked with heaps of TLC. Water, soft drinks and hot beverages followed. It was the family and fellowship that was the most important element. Earlier in the day Christmas breakfast was a family affair too.

Throughout the day as I watched one Christmas movie after another on the telly, I pondered over why we celebrate Christmas. I’ve attached this interesting link on the origins of Christmas wherein lies the origins of the Christian Christmas celebration. As a country colonised by the British and Germans and later administered by Australia, we have taken on whatever Christmas traditions they practiced – perhaps not all of the traditions though.

As a Christian, I thought about the gifts I have received for Christmas this year, and my thoughts naturally turned to the more significant gift. The birth of Jesus Christ our Saviour.  When we have opened our presents and  have enjoyed all the Christmas treats,  in the final analysis – that one Christmas gift is the only one that remains because of the world of difference it makes in our lives when we believe. The birth of Christ brought hope and faith and so each Christmas the hope for a wonderful life in Christ.

I thought about the proclamation in Luke 1: 14, “You will have great joy and gladness, and many will rejoice at His birth” and from Isaiah 9:6, “For a child is born to us, a son is given to us. The government will rest on his shoulders. And he will be called: Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” A gentle reminder for 25th December.

I wish all my family, friends, colleagues and readers a wonderful Christmas Day.  I trust that you all had a wonderful day with family and friends wherever you are.

Author: IslandMeri

I am based in Port Moresby, the capital city of Papua New Guinea. The purpose of this blog is to share my magic moments in Papua New Guinea, elsewhere in the Pacific and the world. I have many creative pursuits - singing, songwriting, amateur photography and blogging.

2 thoughts on “Christmas Day 2011”

  1. Hi Pamela,

    Great to hear from you. That is so nice that your daughter joined you and having local lamb for your main meal and a tree that can be replanted. This year we didn’t have a tree of any sort. I just didn’t feel motivated to have one. Perhaps I’ll use a potted plant instead – a leafy one.

    Best wishes,
    Mari

  2. What a lovely celebration with your family. I am fortunate to have my daughter nearby and we celebrated with her. I make turkey for Thanksgiving and this Christmas we had lamb from a local farm. For the first time, I also had a tree that is alive and can be replanted. I feel this way the spirit of Christmas lives on.
    Best wishes for the New Year to you and yours
    Pamela

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